Social & economic policy

Social policy refers to the practice of social intervention, aimed at securing social change, to promote the welfare and wellbeing of citizens. It refers to both the practice of and academic study of policy action. This document collection is aimed at supporting the social policy formulation process, in South Africa and other developing countries.


Related publications

Policy brief with key messages from UNIEF's recent report, Combating poverty & inequality: Structural change, social policy and politics which attempts to explain how poverty reduction depends crucially on the interconnections among economic development, social policy and politics. Argues that there is a need for new directions in macroeconomic policy and structural change to generate decent employment.

The Multidimensional Poverty Index or MPI is an international poverty measure developed by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative (OPHI) for the United Nations Development Programme’s flagship Human Development Report. The innovative index reflects the multiple deprivations that a poor person faces with respect to education, health and living standards. This brief summarises the method and key findings for 2011 and shows how the MPI can be used.

One page brief arguing that the rate of progress in achieving the MDGs is a more important measure than whether targets are to be met.
Recommends priorities for a reform of the international financial system.
This policy brief explores women as a central factor in food security. It investigates the gendered dimensions of hunger and malnutrition in South Africa, in order to foster an understanding of the relations between gender, food insecurity and policy.
­Policy brief which argues that a universal income grant would be a powerful intervention for radically reducing the depth and scale of impoverishment, and for enhancing ­liberty.
Brief from a senior policy seminar which considered policy responses to the global economic recession, with an emphasis on African research utilisation.
A policy brief which identifies a social agenda as crucial in addressing the global financial crisis.
Reports the findings of an online survey of 211 public sector officials and private ­sector executives in July and August 2009.
Summarises three case studies on policy development and examines the political drivers of change that influence policy on child well-being.
Recommendations to African countries on how to manage the economic crisis with international support.
Refers to a paradigm shift that demands an in-­depth analysis of the limits of the current development model.
Issue Three of the PAN newsletter focuses on the interface between child-centred evidence and related policy. It features a range of resources that illustrate how child-focused data and research evidence can contribute to and inform better outcomes for children when formulating social policy.
­Focuses on the transformative dimension of social policy and its link with economic develelopment.
An HSRC policy brief on Millennium Development Goals relating to water, sanitation, education and health challenges facing the Southern African Development Community.
A summary which is part of initial findings from an ongoing review of progress made towards the Millennium Development Goals.
Peer reviewed positioning paper which reviews the literature on social inclusion and housing as the foundation for an empirical research project on the best forms of policy intervention.

This training manual is divided into five modules. Each module states clearly its objectives and the various aspects it addresses. The first module deals with industrial relations and trade union economic and social priorities. The second module presents the trade union research methods and procedures. Statistics for trade union actions are discussed in Module Three. The fourth module is devoted to the various aspects related to the functioning of the national economy. The fifth and last module discusses contemporary issues related to economic and social development in Africa.

This handbook provides Members of Parliament with information on children’s issues and their rights. Its purpose is to equip MPs with the tools to integrate a child-rights perspective into all work that Members engage with.

The main purpose of this handbook is to facilitate the investment process of a public research institute in developing a system (from the simplest to the most sophisticated) of monitoring and evaluation (M&E), and knowledge management (KM) of the impact of research on public policy.
Aims to provide critical information, basic data and interpretations that can enhance decision making on issues involving China and Africa.
Aims to provide analytical tools and resources to assist analysts and managers with policy development or service-planning projects.
Provides analytical tools and resources to assist analysts and managers with policy development or service-planning in the area of sustainable development.­
Sets out the key issues to consider when designing and managing evaluations, and the presentation and interpretation of evaluation results. Describes why thinking about evaluation before and during the policy design phase can help to improve the quality of evaluation results without needing to hinder the policy proce­ss.
Call for the development of a course which will improve  organizational capacity to influence public policies in developing countries - deadline 23 January 2011
A case book aimed at ensuring­ that managers are using evidence to make decisions and development stakeholders are able to keep track of progress.
Reviews international good practice for using data in policymaking and develops a conceptual framework for characterising and classifying the different elements of a data strategy for public sector orga­nisations.
A free, online, interactive tool, which maps and graphs more than 175 indicators from the World Bank’s development database.
A handbook designed for parliamentarians in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) on the role of social transfers as a specific social protection policy instrument for reducing chronic poverty and inequality and for promoting inclusive, or pro-poor, economic growth.
In the final issue of the PAN newsletter for 2011 ­we look at how the evaluation of government programmes can be invaluable in improving performance and service delivery.
A presentation outlining approaches to achieving research-based­ policies.

This is the first edition of the Policy > Action Network newsletter, From Evidence to Action, published with support from the Programme to Support Pro-Poor Policy Development (PSPPD), a partnership between the Presidency and the Eu­ropean Union.­

A conceptual framework to be used in the production of case studies which identify factors that help or hinder rigorous impact evaluations from influencing policy.

The paper begins by documenting the historical context for current cash transfer programmes. It goes on to look at evidence concerning the aggregate impact of these cash transfers on poverty levels. Thereafter, it reviews the literature that has attempted to rigorously evaluate the impact of the cash transfers on specific socio-economic outcomes and on behaviour. Given this evidence, the paper concludes by looking at the feasibility and appropriateness of introducing conditionalities into what is currently an unconditional cash transfer programme.

This report presents the findings of a research team’s analysis of a specially designed survey fielded in rural and urban areas of 5 South African provinces, supporting the rigorous impact assessment of how access to the CSG affects key aspects of child and adolescent well-being.  Also refer to the executive summary and the policy brief, South Africa’s Child Support Grant: Overall findings from an integrated qualitative-quantitative evaluation

Call for proposals to conduct a series of case studies to identify factors that contribute to or impede evidence from rigorous impact evaluations to influence policy(deadline is 28 February 2011).
­This database provides policymakers and practitioners with easy access to systematic reviews that examine evidence on the effects of social and economic development interventions in low- and middle-income countries. It draws together systematic reviews from a range of sources and covers all sectors.

Reviews findings of research on the benefits of basic income grants, conducted by BIGC in Namibia.

Describes some of the methods and activities developed by the Relay programme and how they were applied to Kenyan tax and governance issues.
Agricultural Policy Action Plan

The Agricultural Policy Action Plan (APAP) has been reviewed to ensure that it becomes a  job driver and promotes growth and rural incomes.  The Integrated Growth and Development Policy (IGDP) serves as the sector policy, and the Agricultural Policy Action Plan (APAP) as a programmatic response to key policy documents including: the National Development Plan (NDP); the New Growth Path (NGP), the Medium Term Strategic Framework - particularly Outcomes 4, 7 and 10.

ANC discussion documents 2015

The African National Congress (ANC) will hold its 4th National General Council (NGC) from 9th to 12th October 2015. This NGC, like the three preceeding it, is convened in fulfillment of the resolution taken at the ANC's 50th National Conference in Mahikeng in 1997, which directed that the organisation should hold a General Council mid-term its 5 year conference cycle. The discussion document can be downloaded above. The following policy areas are prioritised in the document: 1.Balance of Forces 2.Economic Transformation 3.Education and Health 4.Legislature and Governance 5.Social Transformation 6.The battle of ideas, media transformation & diversity, and accelerating digital future. 7.Peace and Stability 8.International Relations 9.Rural development and Land Reform

 

Discussion document for public comment on the National Liquor Policy. Note issues around minimum age for purchasing alcohol, distance from schools and the need for education around liquor consumption as issues affecting the wellbeing of children.

NDP 2030

The National Development Plan (NDP) aims to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. According to the plan, South Africa can realise these goals by drawing on the energies of its people, growing an inclusive economy, building capabilities, enhancing the capacity of the state, and promoting leadership and partnerships throughout society. The popular version in all official languages and two-page illustrated versions are also available.

 

Resolution adopted by the General Assembly: 55/2.

Documents South Africa’s social and economic plan for eliminating poverty and reducing inequality and incorporates a number of child-specific developmental goals.

This delivery agreement provides detail to the outputs, targets, indicators and key activities to achieve outcome 4, identifies required inputs and clarifies the roles and responsibilities of the various delivery partners. It spells out who will do what, by when and with what resources. The outcomes apply to the whole of government and are long term. While the delivery agreement may contain longer term outputs and targets, it also includes outputs and associated targets that are realisable in the next 4 years.

Documents South Africa’s economic development plan for the medium term. It is contextualised against the prioritisation of South Africa as a developmental state and targets the development of human resources and the reduction of inequality.

Policy framework for post-apartheid restructuring of social welfare services, programmes and social security and emphasises the need for attaining equity and redress through social development.

Presidency State of the Nation home page with additional information and links.­
A short guide providing an overview of the provisions of the Act that are most relevant for health ­professionals.­
A resource guide which provides a simplified yet comprehensive guide to policies, legislation, jurisprudence (case law) and practice in relation to urban housing in South Africa.
The Presidency has published the National Evaluation Draft Policy Framework for public comment. Comments can be emailed to Dr Ian Goldman at [email protected] by 30 September 2011. For enquiries call Dr Ian Goldman at (012) 308 1918. ­­
The most r­ecent youth policy developed by the Policy Unit in the South African Presidency.
Provides a framework to p­resent aggregate data on progress in human development.
From the Third ordinary session of the Labour and Social Affairs Commission of the African Union.
A collective response to the international economic crisis from the South African Presidential Economic Joint Working Group.
This study provides data and analysis for assessing the 'social health' of the nation.

This report suggests South Africa has experienced a silent coup that has removed the ANC from its place as the primary force for transformation in society. Four public moments define this new era: the Marikana Massacre on 16 August 2012; the landing of the Gupta plane at Waterkloof Air Base in April 2013; the attempted bribing of former Deputy Minister of Finance Mcebisi Jonas to sell the National Treasury to the shadow state in late 2015; and the Cabinet reshuffle in March 2017. Resistance and capture is what South African politics is about today. 

South African cities as effective drivers of local and national development” is the theme of the fourth edition of the State of South African Cities. It is the product of the accumulated wisdom of five years of knowledge generation and engagement by the SACN and the broader fraternity of urban development practitioners, scholars and analysts. The report’s aim is to improve our understanding of the role of cities and what is required to ensure their success. The Peoples' guide to the report is also available at the above link.

 

Discussion documents for the African National Congress (ANC) National General Council (NGC) to be held from 9-12 October 2015. The ANC website reports that it is expected to unpack amongst others, how society can participate in reviewing and fine tuning ANC policies. Comment on the documents on the ANC website here

The 20 Year Review synthesis report published in 2014 was informed by several thematic areas. These are regarded as focal areas to tell the story of South Africa’s progress since democracy. The 21 thematic background papers were written by officials in the Presidency and other government departments using research and other evidence to inform progress, sector developments and challenges still remaining. The body of work that went into developing these papers was extensive with the goal of understanding where we came from in order to inform South Africa’s future trajectory.  Each of the thematic papers was based on background papers which are available at the link above.

PAN:Children is hosting a Colloquium on lone mothers, social security and dignity in South Africa on 6 June 2014 at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) in Pretoria. The purpose of this colloquium is to share results from DFID/ESRC -funded project that is nearing completion and to discuss with the attendees the emerging findings and policy implications. The project entitled ' Lone mothers in South Africa- The role of social security in respecting and protecting dignity' was led by Professor Noble at the University of Oxford and involved collaborations with colleagues at the Human Sciences Research Council and the University of the Western Cape. This event is for stakeholders in government and civil society.

The aim of this report is to take up the National Planning Commission’s offer to engage with the National Development Plan Vision 2030. It ams to provide a constructively critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the policy proposals of the National Development Plan (NDP) and of the underlying diagnostic studies on which it is based.

This brief outlines some of the different approaches taken by foreign and international institutions seeking to advance evidence-based policy (EBP), and to identify innovations and best practices emerging from their design that might translate well to the UK context and the realm of social policy.

This report presents the contemporary global context and charts a path for policymakers and citizens to navigate the increasing interconnec tedness of the world and to face the growing global challenges. It describes how the dynamics of power, voice and wealth in the world are changing and identifies new policies and institutions necessary to address these 21st century realities and promote human development with greater equity, sustainability and social integration. Identifies reforms necessary at both global and national level with an emphasis on building social cohesion, the need for state commitment to education, health and social protection, and openness to trade integration emerge as means of navigating towards sustainable and equitable human development.

Africa is the world’s second-fastest-growing region. Poverty is falling, and around 90 million of its households have joined the world’s consuming classes—an increase of 31 million in just over a decade. This report argues that the continent must create wage-paying jobs more quickly to sustain these successes and ensure that growth benefits the majority of its people.

The political freedoms ushered in by the post 1994 transition were seen at that time as the basis for redressing long-standing economic deprivations suffered by the majority of the population. The reduction of poverty, in all its dimensions, was the goal. This volume assembles 12 essays by researchers who ask how well South Africa has addressed these problems.

This report presents a detailed analysis of changes in both poverty and inequality since the fall of Apartheid, and the potential drivers of such developments. Use is made of national survey data from 1993, 2000 and 2008. These data show that South Africa’s high aggregate level of income inequality increased between 1993 and 2008. The same is true of inequality within each of South Africa’s four major racial groups.

The Social Profile of South Africa 2002-2010 is an annual report first produced by Statistics South Africa in 2009 to analyse and explore changes in the situation of children, the youth, the elderly, women and disabled persons over time. The report uses General Household Survey (GHS) data from 2002 to 2010. The focal areas of this study are based on the current social agenda of the government and strategic priorities related to vulnerable groups.

This qualitative study assessed the impact of the global economic crisis on children and poor families in South Africa. The study also examined the coping strategies utilized by affected individuals and households as well as the adequacy of existing social protection programmes in dealing with the effects of the shock.

Argues that strong social programmes can play a vital part in an economic stimulus package.

Addresses what policy makers need, what the humanities and social sciences offer and the challenges of providing better evidence for public policy making.
Citizen participation in policymaking and service design has been debated or attempted, but too infrequently realised. Considers current reform initiatives in the Australian Public Service (APS) and examines the implications of citizen-centric ideals for the processes and structures of government agencies.­
Presents the results of a large-scale study of ­skill demands of five economic clusters in South Africa, to inform the conceptualisation and formulation of skills development strategies.
An initiative by the South African Institute of Race Relations which aims to track development trends in South Africa, and will be released on a quarterly basis. ­
Reviews developments over the past five years, identifying six priority areas, three for African policymakers and three for their international partners.
Full text of monograph launched at conference on the welfare state, with chapter on the need for a values-led debate on shaping public policy.

Highlights policy innovations including expanded social protection programmes in Africa that are facilitating progress toward at­tainment of the Millennium Development Goals.

­Reports that the gap between the rich and the poor in OECD countries has reached its highest level for over over 30 years. Includes a special focus on inequality in growing economies.
The second in th­e HSRC series that aims to monitor the evolving dynamics of South African social values in relation to broader societal developments.
A report intended as an initial high-level paper to stimulate discussion amongst New Zealand policy advisors and policy makers.­
A general scan of current literature which aims to provide an overview of approaches, guidelines, tools, and policy options being employed to adapt to climate change.­
C­onsiders the processes that have guided fundamental decisions about electricity choice, and their implications for public interests over the long term.
Uses administrative and survey data from a large sample of participants in two distinct start-up programmes and a control group of unemployed individuals.
A simplified yet comprehensive overview of law, policy and practice relating to basic sanitation in South Africa. ­
The result of a collective process of reflection on the meaning and implications of community protests for local governance. The network’s third publication providing a civil society perspective on the state of local governance. ­
Draws together evidence and synthesises the findings from eight African case studies that formed part of the HERANA project.
Assesses the progress made by South African cities over the last decade in relation to key development outcomes and whether developmental metropolitan government has had the desired effect in improving socio-economic and environmental conditions.
Reviews unique community contributions that are successful in addressing complex policy issues.
An issues paper which summarises the major points and offers ­policy recommendations.
­Briefly reviews the literature on economic growth and poverty and examines whether economic growth influences poverty dynamics.
Investigates whether the introduction of wage subsidies is an appropriate policy measure for dealing with South Africa’s particular sources of unemployment.
Assesses the progress made by South African cities over the last decade in relation to key development outcomes and reviews strategic problems and opportunities relating to planning and management­
Recommends that African countries adopt a developmental state approach that uses the market as an instrument rather than a sole mechanism for fostering long-term investment, rapid and sustained economic growth, equity ­and social development.
Makes policy recommendations to reduce the impact of the economic recession on low-income countries.
Argues that economic transformation in Africa requires the state to play a central role—using a comprehensive development framework—in planning, articulating and implementing policies aimed at ensuring efficient allocation of resources.
Reviews the changing patterns of science, and scientific collaboration, in order to provide a basis for understanding such ongoing changes. Aims to identify the opportunities and benefits of international collaboration, to consider how they can best be realised, and to initiate a debate on how international scientific collaboration can be harnessed to tackle global problems more effectively.
Explores the relationship between ‘state-business relations’ and pro-poor growth in post-apartheid South Africa. ­
Recommends a combination of well-coordinated macro-economic policies together with employment, labour market, skills and social protection ­policies.
A review of Norway's research system in preparation for possible reforms. Based on comparative data from Canada, Denmark, Finland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, the United Kingdom and Norway.­
Aims­ to determine which employment and social protection policies yielded good results and in which context. Reviews 13 policies identified in the Global Jobs Pact of June 2009.
­The objective of this Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) is to identify the reasons given in the existing research literature for why crime in South Africa is so violent.
Examines the changing nature of violence in the 21st century, and underlines the negative impact of repeated cycles of violence on a country or region’s development prospects.
With examples from the economics, democracy, crime, corruption, and health arenas, concluding with policy implications.
This working paper explores the current understanding of the link between knowledge and policy in development.
­This report reflects an analysis of key indicators to assess the fulfi lment of children’s rights in South Africa. Most of the data is derived from Statistics South Africa’s General Household Survey (GHS) which covers six broad areas, education, health, social development, housing, household access to services and facilities, food security and agriculture. Download part one and part two.
Essays from organisations using different methodologies and approaches to generate evidence and influence policy and practice in a number of service areas including criminal justice, childrens' services and poverty reduction.
L­ooks back rigorously at the past several decades and identifies often surprising trends and patterns with important lessons for the future.
A concise overview of the progress Africa has made over the previous year in seven areas, namely economic growth, governance, peace and security, social development, food and nutrition security, climate change, and development cooperation and finance. Provides a series of practical recommendations for policy makers.
Reviews programmes seeking to enhance the interconnections between social scientific research and policy and highlights issues around the nature of ­these linkages.

Review of the state of the social sciences and how knowledge is produced, disseminated and used; includes a chapter on ­­Social sciences and po­licy-makers.­­­

Assembled collaboratively over the past year by several South African civil society organisations (CSOs), this report scrutinises the country’s track record in fighting corruption, managing diversity, addressing xenophobia and racism, managing elections, consolidating democracy and upholding the rule of law, as well as confronting social exclusion and effective service delivery. ­­
E­xtracts lessons from case studies of Brazil, Vietnam, and Ghana to suggest three key areas where action by governments is likely to deliver: a proper redistributive agenda, appropriate macroeconomic prudence, and a policy environment that fosters a pro-poor private sector.
The first document mapping activities in science, technology and innovation in African countries, for the formulation of policies for science development and the promotion of knowledge-based socio-economic development.
Commentary from the South African Civil Society Information Service (Sacsis) that the Zuma administration is attempting to insulate public policy choices from contestation in society, and as a consequence failing to build broader­ policy consensus.­
Explores the main lines of interaction between growth and distribution to determine the potential for pro-poor growth.
Examines the global state of adolescents, outlines the challenges they face in health, education, protection and participation, and argues that investing in them now is our best hope of breaking the intergenerational cycle of poverty and inequity and laying the foundation for a more peaceful, tolerant and equitable world.
Annual review of the status of South Africa’s children focusing on access to education.
This analysis provides new understandings of current concepts of 'globalisation', 'use-oriented' research, 'knowledge society and economy', and 'national system of innovation'.
Themed essays illustrate­ how children’s participation in decisions that affect them is not only a legal right, but that it is essential for a healthy democracy, effective service delivery and children’s optimal development. Includes a list of resources on ­on children's participation­
A staff working paper using a human capital earnings function and data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey to estimate the effects of education and health status on wages.
­This report seeks to focus on the core, critical interventions that will be needed if South Africa’s development objectives are to be ­met.
Documents outcomes of regional and electronic citizen consultations held in conjunction with various partners during 2010 with the ultimate aim of shaping the African ­policy agenda for the forthcoming decade.

Annual country review with the following key findings:

South Africa is advancing, but failing to fully achieve its considerable potential, the macroeconomic policy mix has been insufficiently supportive of growth while allowing large budget deficits to persist, the interaction of weak competition in product markets and dysfunctional labour markets is holding back growth and aggravating unemployment, education is a critical problem, and, greater use of market instruments can help deal with long-term environmental challenges at least cost and with limited demands on scarce administrative capacity.

The World Development Report 2013 takes the centrality of jobs in the development processas as its starting point and challenges and reframes how we think about work. Adopting a cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary approach, the report looks at why some jobs do more for development than others. Finds that the jobs with the greatest development payoffs are those that make cities function better, connect the economy to global markets, protect the environment, foster trust and civic engagement, or reduce poverty. Critically, these jobs are not only found in the formal sector; depending on the country context, informal jobs can also be transformational.

This country briefing presents the results of the Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) and explains key findings graphically. Further information as well as international comparisons are available here.

The third South Africa Economic Update, with a focus on inequality of opportunity. Section 1 provides an economic update and assesses the challenges and near-term prospects facing the South African economy. Section 2 focuses on inequality of opportunity in South Africa. For the first time, using innovative techniques, this section presents an analysis of the interlinked inequality of opportunities for children and for access to employment.

This report introduces a unique and unprecedented series of data on the state of capacity in Africa. It also examines key issues and challenges confronting in-country and cross-border capacity development.
Calls for an assessment of gaps in social policy, especially in relation to legislation on social protection, with special attention to the role of women and children.
The third in a series which discusses what needs to be done further in reaching the MDGs,  an abridged version of a much more comprehensive joint Economic Commission for Africa, African Union Commission, and African Development Bank report.
A new website with country case studies, each focusing on one of eight major areas of development and what interventions have worked.
Aims to identify the main challenges confronting the country and examine their underlying causes. Serves to advance the discussion about the major issues confronting South Africa.
Suggests that poor policy outcomes lies less in the policies than in the political interactions and processes behind these policies. ­
A comparative study of the food-security policy agendas in the IBSA countries which aims to  identify and examine critical issues and good practices in order to reveal relevant points for knowledge sharing. Includes a one-page summary.­

The National Executive Committee  (NEC) of the African National Congress (ANC) adopted the roadmap to the National Policy Conference, which will be held at the end of June 2017. The National Policy Conference reviews ANC policy and makes recommendations on amendments or new policies to the National Conference. Discussion documents are available at the link below

To achieve the objectives of the National Development Plan (NDP) in addressing the triple challenges of poverty, inequality and unemployment, government requires data sources that provide empirical evidence which informs society on how far we have come in addressing these challenges and how far we still need to go. In 2006, the Presidency commissioned the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit (SALDRU) at the University of Cape Town to undertake a panel study, the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS). South Africa has joined developed countries such as the UK and the US and developing countries such as Mexico and Indonesia in having a national panel survey. South Africa is a society that is undergoing rapid economic, political and social change, and the government identified the need for a panel study in order to better understand social change, mobility, poverty and household dynamics.This seminar explored the lives of children and youth in South Africa

What level of income is needed these days in order to get by, or better still in order to have a decent standard of living?  South Africa is moving in a positive direction towards implementing a national minimum wage, but there is concern about whether it will be sufficient to enable people to cover their costs of living. The amount required for an adequate diet is calculated by Statistics South Africa, but the costs of other aspects of life are less well established. This seminar comprises a series of short presentations with opportunity for discussions. The presentations will comprise: (1) recent findings on the incomes of those who do enjoy a socially-derived decent standard of living in South Africa, and the challenge of how to cost out such a standard of living in order to engage with debates on the adequacy of wages, social security and the social wage; (2) current work in the UK on the Minimum Income Standards (MIS) approach to costing out a decent standard of living, and how this work has been used to inform policy; (3) findings from a pilot of the MIS approach in South Africa; (4) insights from a parallel pilot of the MIS approach in Mexico. The seminar will conclude by identifying pragmatic steps towards costing out a decent standard of living, followed by discussion about the opportunities this will present for sharpening debates about thresholds of adequacy. BACKROUND DOCUMENTS AND PRESENTATIONS ARE ATTACHED.

This research seminar focused on how science councils can balance multiple roles, to conduct research and innovation that contribute to the realisation of national developmental goals. The value of such a workshop is that it can bring together researchers, policymakers and knowledge producers to engage around current practice, to inform policy strategies and mechanisms that may facilitate the promotion of science, technology and innovation for inclusive development at national and organisational levels.

Three main objectives informed the structure of the programme, the presentations and the discussions:

  1. To provide new research evidence on the roles of science councils in the national system of innovation in terms of the goals of inclusive national development.
  2. To examine the nature of the institutional strategies, structures and mechanisms science councils use to promote linkages and interaction with firms, government, civil society and communities.
  3. To inform strategic policy on the role of science councils and innovation for inclusive development.

The programme and presentations can be downloaded above. The workshop report and other documentation will be circulated as soon as they are finalised. Please submit any relevant documentation to [email protected] for upload onto the Policy Action Network website. Subscribe to PAN and join the discussion.

This seminar, which is part of the Department of Science and Technology (DST) Human and Social Dynamics (HSD) Research Seminar Series, was designed to facilitate a space for engagement among various stakeholders including government, business, academics and civil society to: Reflect on the various ways in which women in mining in South Africa face challenges and experience barriers that impede the true transformation of the sector; understand the potential benefits for women in the mining project; and explore areas and opportunities to promote gender responsive policy and practice in mining.

The overall objectives were to understand and consider the research regarding the status of women in the mining sector; present best practice models in integrating gender equality into mining practices; explore policy impediments on addressing gender inequality; and highlight initiatives to promote inclusive and gender responsive investment in the mining sector. Presentations will be loaded as soon as they are available

The theme of the seminar was to address one of the World Social Science Forum's (WSSF) key areas of concern, and to cut across many disciplines within the humanities and social sciences. Discussions on terrorism and new militarism at the seminar include among thers, terrorist and counter terrorist attacks, state sponsored terrorism, terrorism against civilians, state violence against nascent popular democracy movements, human rights violations, etc. Therefore the aims of this seminar were to: 

  • To draw attention to the WSSF and its core theme, Transforming global relations for a just world, and to expand the WSSF’s impact, given the event’s exclusivity and limitations of access.
  • To provide an avenue for academic researchers and especially postgraduate students, including those from rural-based universities, to engage in discussions and   exchange knowledge across disciplinary and institutional boundaries.
  • To present and discuss new and ongoing research and suggest new research agendas in SSH with a view of forging closer links between the research communities in these fields.
  • To  disseminate research findings and transmit a body of new knowledge through interactive dialogue between top level experts in the field, academics,   postgraduate students and members of civil society.
  • To  promote interdisciplinary research and enhance wider public understanding of and interest in the social sciences, including the value and status of both   individual and team-based research.
  • To  facilitate networking, the exchange of information, and an exhibition of  scholarly materials and publications

Presentations and the seminar programme can be downloaded above.

#militarisms #terrorism #humanrights #transdisciplinary

This seminar on rural democracy in the Eastern Cape aimed to provide a forum for the various stakeholders to engage constructively on pertinent questions related to the issues of traditional leadership, democracy, and land, and the policy implications these possibly have. Using the case of the Xhalanga District and the role that research played in the court judgement mentioned above, issues that could possibly be addressed include the following:

  • What are the policy implications of the court judgement, especially given the fact that there are already in office headmen who were not elected; what becomes of these headmen?
  • If headmen are elected, what become of municipal councillors who are also elected?
  • Are we heading for a situation of "two bulls in one kraal", if so, how do we deal with the spill over that result from this?

The first of two related Human and Social Dynamics (HSD) seminar series convened by the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC).The seminar brought together stakeholders in the rural local government and land sector, which include among others, academics and researchers, representatives from government departments such as the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, non-governmental organisations, local government entities such as the Rural Democratisation Task Team in the Sakhisizwe Local Municipality, rural social movements such as Zingisa  Education and Development Organisation (Amathole District Municipality), Masifunde Education and Development Organisation (Ndlambe municipal area), the  Amadiba Crisis Committee (Mbizana area), as well as representatives from the Congress of Traditional Leadership of South Africa (CONTRALESA). Presentations to be loaded as the conference proceeds.

On 12 May 2014, a workshop took place in Pretoria, South Africa, which focused on substance abuse, harm reduction and harm prevention. The workshop - a joint initiative by the DST and the HSRC - brought together various stakeholders across sectors and civil society. Given the above scenario, DST and the HSRC made a joint decision to maintain the momentum of interest and concern around substance abuse and harm prevention and therefore need to have a follow-up seminar to formulate a research agenda. The purpose of the event held on 2 March 2015 was to look at the need to conduct a national epidemiological survey every three to four years to establish the prevalence of the various forms of substance use and abuse of licit and illicit drugs at all ages and life stages over time (longitudinally). The conference programme for this seminar and a link to the video presentation are available above.

In the context of its nationwide implementation, the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) is charged with creating work opportunities in public social programmes (e.g. community-based health and social welfare care and early childhood development). It is recognised that the social sector contributes to the EPWP by employing people, through NGOs and CBOs, to work on home-based care and early childhood development programmes amongst many other programmes. This DST Government Cluster Policy Workshop held on 31 October 2013 provided a platform to address and critique the subject of the EPWP contribution to national development. Presentations and a policy note can be downloaded above. A full report is available on request by contacting the Policy Action Network

This Department of Science and Technology Government Cluster Policy Workshop held on 11 September 2013 spoke to Outcome 7 in government’s programme of action, namely the creation of vibrant, equitable and sustainable rural communities. Specifically Output 4 – improved employment and skills development opportunities (indicator: number of youth participating in the National Rural Youth Service Corps [NARYSEC]).  Participants in this workshop reflected on the successes of and challenges faced in applying the approach and methods used in the NARYSEC programme, drew upon comparable programme experiences, and examined pertinent research evidence. It is expected that the knowledge shared and the recommendations generated in the workshop will inform other national and provincial youth development programmes. Presentations are attached and a policy note from the workshop can be downloaded above. A full report is available from the Policy Action Network on request.

This Human and Social Dynamics (HSD) Research Seminar was hosted by the Department of Science and Technology (DST) in collaboration with the Human Sciences Research Council, the Southern African Social Policy Research Institute (SASPRI), the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) Rhodes University and the Programme to Support Pro-Poor Policy Development.

SAIMD 2011 is a ward-level measure of multiple deprivation. It comprises a weighted aggregate of four domains or dimensions of deprivation: material deprivation, employment deprivation, education deprivation and living environment deprivation, and was developed to facilitate sub-municipal analysis of multiple deprivation and its component domains (Noble et al., 2013). The SAIMD 2011 is the latest in a series of indices of multiple deprivation for South and southern Africa that have been developed using census data to profile multiple deprivation at sub- municipal level. The original South African study for 2001 was at ward level (e.g. Noble et al., 2006 and 2010) and was undertaken in collaboration with HSRC. It was followed by a series of further refinements to develop a sub-ward or ‘datazone’ level index for 2001 (e.g.  Noble and Wright, 2013), a series of child focused indices (e.g. Barnes et al., 2009), as well as updates to 2007 at municipal and datazone levels. 

Full reports and additional documentation will be circulated when they are made available.

 

The purpose of this colloquium is to share resullts from a DFID/ESRC- funded project . Currently in South Africa lone mothers of working age are only entitled to social assistance for themselves if they are disabled. A means-tested Child Support Grant is payable on behalf of their children but, though important, it is small in amount and is not intended to contribute to the caregiver's living expenses. In the context of South Africa’s Constitution which declares that ‘everyone has the right to have their dignity respected and protected’ and that access to social security is to be progressively realised, this project explores the meaning of dignity in lone mothers' lives and the extent to which social security protects or erodes their dignity. Below are themed reports of the project:

Themed Working Paper 1: Defining Lone Motherhood in South Africa

Themed Working Paper 2 :The impact of poverty and inequality on the dignity of lone mothers in South Africa

Themed Working Paper 3: Social security and the dignity of lone mothers in South Africa

PAN: Children is hosting a dialogue series titled:[email protected]: An overview of child related policy development in the 20 year review on 16 May 2014 at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) in Pretoria and Cape Town . The Twenty Year Review provides an evaluation of the policies instituted by government since the advent of democracy. While highlighting achievements, it also addresses shortcomings and looks at initiatives and operational plans for the future. The main speaker of the dialogue is Ms. Sadan a programme manager of the Programme to Support Pro-poor Policy Development Phase II (PSPPD II), which is located within the National Planning Commission (NPC) in the Presidency. She will look specifically at the development of child related policy through a 20-year lens, elaborating on how far we have come and comment on the future of child policy in South Africa.

 

This Department of Science and Technology Government Cluster Policy Workshop (GCPW) addressed the critical issues of spatial inequalities in South Africa, public perceptions towards inequalities and preferences for redistribution, as well as the relationship between the two. These issues are situated within the broader debates about inequalities as determinants of various social problems including poor health outcomes, social unrest and crime. The GCPW was informed by a research project which is being undertaken collaboratively between researchers at the University of Oxford and the HSRC. By investigating whether citizens' attitudes to inequality in South Africa are associated with their experience of inequality at the local level, the study attempts to provide new insights into inequality in South Africa to support evidence-based policy making. The project was motivated by three pressing needs:

  • first, the need to better understand the unequal spatial configuration of poverty and deprivation at small area level as a measure of people's lived experience of inequality;
  • second, the need to better understand public attitudes towards inequality and towards policy options for redress; and,
  • third, the need to explore whether people's attitudes are influenced by their lived experience of inequality

This record has been updated with additional presentations. In addition to further presentations are available on request as they are too large to load onto the website: The relationship between spatial inequality and attitudes to inequality in South Africa (David McLennan and Michael Noble) and Inclusion, access and the urban advantage (Philip Harrison). (email [email protected])

In November 2010, CDE hosted a Round Table to examine some of the key issues surrounding this proposal. These included: Would a wage subsidy raise employment levels. If so, by how much, and at what cost? Would this be an appropriate response to the unemployment crisis? And would it be sustainable? The issues involved are complex, and sometimes quite technical. The workshop sought to address them as systematically as possible by addressing, first, the central importance of employment growth in shaping South Africa’s long-term developmental prospects. Next, it dealt with the international experience of wage subsidies. It then analysed the effect of South Africa’s existing labour market policies on employment levels. Finally, it examined the results of a number of attempts to model the impact of wage subsidies on the South African labour market and to estimate the costs and benefits of such a policy. While some issues of policy design were discussed, the main focus of the Round Table was the feasibility, desirability and possible impact of the proposed wage subsidy. This report summarises the presentations and discussions, followed by concluding comments.

Showcased innovation developments in South Africa and provided a platform for developing an innovation policy dialogue with European partners.
Essays based on a conference which aimed to ­encourage and facilitate debate about the ethical basis for policy making.
Papers from conference aiming to deepen understanding of the complex and pertinent relationship between social cohesion and development.
Examines the concept of social justice in Africa and the possible role to be played by the youth, especially in the age of globalis­ation.­
­Report from a round table of senior economic policy-makers, economists, and leaders from business and civil society which examined the feasibility, desirability and possible impact of the proposed wage subsidy in South Africa­.­
Papers from a workshop highlighting the lack of rigorous evidence in international development, the importance of closing knowledge gaps and the challenges of translating evidence into policy­.
A booklet explaining what 'meaningful engagement' is, when it should take place and the role of community leaders.
Papers from a conference which aimed to identify lessons on what has and has not worked, and to consider how best to deal with emerging challenges, with the emphasis discussing experiences of African countries that have successfully reformed their tax policy and revenue administration systems.
Papers on social and political dimensions of the current crisis,­ policy and institutional reforms, and implications for developing countries.
Conference presentations can now be downloaded. Also look at the summing-­up, Cross cutting golden threads.
Launch workshop report from the Africa Growth Initiative, which works towards sustainable economic development in Africa.
Issues paper discussing the role of the State in African development in order to identify an appropriate set of interventions to enhance the role of the State and other stakeholders in performing the key tasks necessary for economic transformation in Africa.
Presentations from meeting which explored how best African countries can harness knowledge to advance their development and to achieve the targets of the Millennium Declaration Goals (MDGs).
Presentations from the 2008 Social Policy Association conference.

Presentation from a seminar which reviewed evidence-based policy-making and the potential role of evaluation as a key, and a systematic, source of evidence. Presented by Dr Ian Goldman, Deputy Director General, Evaluation and Research, DPME,­ The Presidency.­

A conference aiming to contribute to collaboration for the improved use of research and greater youth involvement in participatory re­search.
Workshop report where participants were enabled to apply a knowledge synthesis ­method including: choosing a relevant policy for study, analysing it, performing a literature review (in a way that differs from literature reviews on simple interventions) and organising deliberative processes.
Link: Econ3x3

Econ3x3 is an independent forum for critical public debate on unemployment and employment, income distri­bution and inclu­sive growth in South Africa. It publishes accessible research- based contribu­tions and expert commentaries. The forum encourages debate on an inte­grated and consistent policy response to unemployment, inequality and poverty and a stronger engagement between research and policy making. Econ3x3 invites contributions from economists and other social science researchers, policymakers and relevant experts.

Aims to strengthen civil society advocacy initiatives to advance access to socioeconomic rights guaranteed in the Constitution.
A new Facebook forum for a national citizens' dialogue, currently working against xenophobia and planning for ­a National Indaba in September 2010.
Join this network to engage with the draft Social Service Professions Bill and advocate for improvements.
This internship offers outstanding graduate-level students the opportunity to acquire direct exposure to IPC-IG’s work as a global forum for policy dialogue and South-South learning on development innovations.
A community of over 1,000 practitioners managing for development results (MfDR) from 37 different African countries and regions across the world.
Report from a workshop which aimed to gain more clarity on the concept of meaningful engagement to feed into civil society strategies and actions.
Presents findings of five research projects around civil society and strategies for achieving social justice in South Africa.­
If you have some ideas on building a better South Africa, please register for and participate in the National Planning Commission (NPC)­ Jam (an online brainstorming event from noon on 28 September until noon on 1 October). Additional information can also be found here. ­
CIPPEC, a leading think tank in Argentina will award 12 scholarships to participate in the third edition of this online training programme developed jointly with Global Development Network (GDN)­ which will start by the end of August 2011.­

Issue five of the newsletter ­From Evidence to Action looks at the education system in South Africa, ­in particular how­ evidence informed policies can be implemented to address many of the problems it faces.­

Report aiming to stimulate discussion ­amongst government officials, public participation practitioners, professional associations and civil society leaders, with executive summary.
Follow events at this open meeting in Dakar, Senegal from 6-11 February.
Download the second issue of the Policy > Action Network newsletter and email [email protected] if you would like to make comments or submissions for the next issue.
A new online resource for policy makers and development practitioners on non-contributory (social) pensions. The site aims to bring together learning from existing social pension schemes around the world in order to inform policy makers, academics and activists.

A pooled funding mechanism for supporting the institutional development of civil society organisations undertaking research and advocacy ­for pro-poor policy development in Ghana.

Consolidation of the State of the Nation and State of the Province addresses prepared by André Viviers, Senior Social Policy Specialist, UNICEF South Africa.

In this first issue of From Evidence to Action for 2012, we look at networks and, specifically, the role they play in changing policy. Our feature article, Getting the most out of policy networks, examines what a network actually is and what makes them effective. Through the example of the Regional Network on Equity in Health in Southern Africa, EQUINET, our case study further explores how to build networks and how they can be used to influence policy. We also find out more about the Policy Action Network, how to manage a Community of Practice. 

This is one in a series of topical guides developed for PAN:Children that provides key information on the current state of affairs in South Africa related to youth and employment. It highlights practical guidance, lessons learned and case studies (both national and international) that will be helpful in policy development dialogue and knowledge sharing.

This review applied a systematic protocol to the identification and retrieval of published and unpublished documents relating to the impacts of employment guarantee schemes and cash transfers on the poor. ­

Government policy & legislation

Agricultural Policy Action Plan

The Agricultural Policy Action Plan (APAP) has been reviewed to ensure that it becomes a  job driver and promotes growth and rural incomes.  The Integrated Growth and Development Policy (IGDP) serves as the sector policy, and the Agricultural Policy Action Plan (APAP) as a programmatic response to key policy documents including: the National Development Plan (NDP); the New Growth Path (NGP), the Medium Term Strategic Framework - particularly Outcomes 4, 7 and 10.

ANC discussion documents 2015

The African National Congress (ANC) will hold its 4th National General Council (NGC) from 9th to 12th October 2015. This NGC, like the three preceeding it, is convened in fulfillment of the resolution taken at the ANC's 50th National Conference in Mahikeng in 1997, which directed that the organisation should hold a General Council mid-term its 5 year conference cycle. The discussion document can be downloaded above. The following policy areas are prioritised in the document: 1.Balance of Forces 2.Economic Transformation 3.Education and Health 4.Legislature and Governance 5.Social Transformation 6.The battle of ideas, media transformation & diversity, and accelerating digital future. 7.Peace and Stability 8.International Relations 9.Rural development and Land Reform

 

Discussion document for public comment on the National Liquor Policy. Note issues around minimum age for purchasing alcohol, distance from schools and the need for education around liquor consumption as issues affecting the wellbeing of children.

NDP 2030

The National Development Plan (NDP) aims to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. According to the plan, South Africa can realise these goals by drawing on the energies of its people, growing an inclusive economy, building capabilities, enhancing the capacity of the state, and promoting leadership and partnerships throughout society. The popular version in all official languages and two-page illustrated versions are also available.

 

Resolution adopted by the General Assembly: 55/2.

Documents South Africa’s social and economic plan for eliminating poverty and reducing inequality and incorporates a number of child-specific developmental goals.

This delivery agreement provides detail to the outputs, targets, indicators and key activities to achieve outcome 4, identifies required inputs and clarifies the roles and responsibilities of the various delivery partners. It spells out who will do what, by when and with what resources. The outcomes apply to the whole of government and are long term. While the delivery agreement may contain longer term outputs and targets, it also includes outputs and associated targets that are realisable in the next 4 years.

Documents South Africa’s economic development plan for the medium term. It is contextualised against the prioritisation of South Africa as a developmental state and targets the development of human resources and the reduction of inequality.

Policy framework for post-apartheid restructuring of social welfare services, programmes and social security and emphasises the need for attaining equity and redress through social development.

Presidency State of the Nation home page with additional information and links.­
A short guide providing an overview of the provisions of the Act that are most relevant for health ­professionals.­
A resource guide which provides a simplified yet comprehensive guide to policies, legislation, jurisprudence (case law) and practice in relation to urban housing in South Africa.
The Presidency has published the National Evaluation Draft Policy Framework for public comment. Comments can be emailed to Dr Ian Goldman at [email protected] by 30 September 2011. For enquiries call Dr Ian Goldman at (012) 308 1918. ­­
The most r­ecent youth policy developed by the Policy Unit in the South African Presidency.
Provides a framework to p­resent aggregate data on progress in human development.
From the Third ordinary session of the Labour and Social Affairs Commission of the African Union.
A collective response to the international economic crisis from the South African Presidential Economic Joint Working Group.
This study provides data and analysis for assessing the 'social health' of the nation.